All posts tagged: book

Imagination Redeemed | Book Review

What if Adam Malloy had a Christian imagination? That’s the question that popped into my head as I neared the end of Imagination Redeemed by Gene Edward Veith Jr. and Matthew P. Ristuccia. Adam, one of the main characters in The Gift and the Defender is gifted with the special power to change the world with his mind. All he has to do is imagine the change and it becomes reality. He makes a lot of mistakes wielding his imagination, precisely because it was forged by the ways of the world instead of by the Word of God. Adam is a super-powered expression of the reality that ideas have consequences. I for one don’t want to make the mistakes Adam did, I want to harden the steel of my Christian imagination. That’s why I read Imagination Redeemed, to sharpen my understanding of the powerful instrument God gave me.  It’s a great book! I’d recommend it to anyone. It’ll strengthen your understanding of the human mind and reveal just how much you use your imagination. The book is a blessing. It …

The River | Book Review

This is the fourth Pastor Stephen Grant Novel (see my reviews of the first three books here, here, and here), and I got to say, it’s the best one yet. In this volume, Ray Keating delivers an action-packed adventure set in Las Vegas that’s full of God, goons, girls, gambling, and of course, gunplay. It’s brimming with ministers, mobsters, and military maneuvers. Okay, enough alliteration. You get what I’m saying. It’s a great read! Your favorite (fictional) Lutheran pastor, Rev. Stephen Grant, and Mrs. Grant find that Sin City lives up to its name. Pastor Grant struggles against the sins of others and his own as life and love hit with intensity. If it wasn’t the Hollywood-esque action that kept me turning the page, it was the intrigue surrounding how God’s Law and Gospel worked on the pastor and those in his life. Five Stars, friends! A few weeks back, when I finished reading The River, I had only one more Pastor Stephen Grant Novel left to read, Murderer’s Row. However, that’s not the case anymore. I’m excited to …

The Green Ember | Book Review

Let’s start where ancient wisdom tells us not to and judge this book by its cover. If I didn’t know anything about S.D. Smith‘s first children’s novel or about Story Warren Books, the cover would’ve been enough to convince me to give it a chance. Zach Franzen‘s art is warm and crisp, inviting viewers to explore the world of these rabbits with swords. Okay, so only one rabbit has a sword on the cover. Not the point. The cover art is superb! That’s the point. Young ones will enjoy finding more of Franzen’s art throughout the book as well. As it stands I actually did know a thing or two about this book and it’s publisher before I purchased it. For instance, Story Warren says they exist to serve you as you foster holy imagination in the children you love. Awesome! Or how about the author’s claim to write new stories with an old soul? Okay. I’m in. It was a no brainer from there. I had to purchase the hardcover edition of The Green Ember, which is a high quality product and …

Root of All Evil? | Book Review

Ray Keating’s second Pastor Stephen Grant novel, Root of All Evil? is a fantastic follow up to Warrior Monk (click here for my review of that work). It’s a well crafted political thriller full of intrigue and theological truth. Keating’s world has proven profitable for contrasting good theology with bad. In this book he tackles money and how it impacts the Church. I was impressed with the skillful and varied way the author deposited the money theme into the story: from global economics, to the prosperity gospel, to expenses that come with operating a parochial school, to the concerns laity have regarding their pastor’s salary. Keating’s economist background pays offs big! I can’t wait to crack open the next book!

The Messengers: Discovered | Book Review

On the back cover of Lisa M. Clark’s debut thriller, The Messengers: Discovered, published by Concordia Publishing House, there is a word printed in small type: futuristic. It’s there under the ISBN barcode. A genre classification. But just how futuristic is this adventure? Clark tells an exciting and believable story centered on the Word of God. The setting, though a dystopian future, isn’t hard to imagine. In light of the rise of ungodliness in America, it’s easy to see the world Simon Clay lives in as one we may well inhabit in the not-too-distant future. Discovered delivers God’s life-forming truth, demonstrating it’s transformative power and the significance it has on those who believe. In fact, it does it with such precision and skill that it begs the question: why doesn’t CPH publish fiction regularly?! With each turn of the page, readers, especially young readers (Clark’s primary audience) are built up in the understanding that there is no darkness that can overcome the light of Christ (John 1:5). A much needed message for all believers today! I bought this book …

Stitched Crosses: Crusade | Book Review

I’m a book geek. I am. I like the medium. When I get a new book, whether it’s actually new or just new to me, before I even begin reading it I spend some time ingesting the product, no, no, the treasure. That’s better. I hold it in my hands, firmly gripping it. I trace my fingers over it. I flip the pages with my thumb. I turn it over analyzing the the spine and the back cover, looking at the layout and design of the whole thing, enjoying all that is book before ever actually getting to the first chapter. I study the copyright page and the title page. All the stuff that is extraneous to the real prize, the story (fiction) or information (non-fiction). Personally, I believe this is a behavior that a lot of book lovers share. I know it’s common to theologians. Call it a symptom of being all about the Word. Or not, it’s up to you. Anyway, I also think I developed this fetish-like quirkiness when I was studying books as …